Can I get out of my lease due to noisy, rude and disgusting neighbors?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I get out of my lease due to noisy, rude and disgusting neighbors?

I have been dealing with noisy upstairs neighbors for about 5 months now. We have let the LL know and she says there is nothing that she can do until a police report is filed. Recently their dog started peeing on their balcony which made it all the way down to my balcony and all over my table. We let the LL know and she spoke with her about it I went outside the next morning and my brand new truck was keyed. Is there a way to get out of this lease so we can just move on? The previous occupant agreed with us in front of LL, who was also the investigating policeman for the keying of my truck. In fct, the last tenant moved out for the same problem and he moved to a different apartment.

Asked on August 23, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Assuming you share a common landlord with the neighbors that are making your life difficult, you might be able to break your lease without recourse. The way to do such is to sit down with your landlord and discuss the problems that you are having in that under the laws of all states a landlord is to provide "quiet enjoyment" to a tenant with respect to a rental.

The problems that you are experiencing go to "quiet enjoyment" issues. If the landlord will not sign an agreement letting you out of your lease without recourse, you should consult with a landlord tenant attorney to see what your legal recourse is.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption