Can I get money owedfor an electric bill that was left in my name when I moved out that my ex-boyfriend did not pay?

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Can I get money owedfor an electric bill that was left in my name when I moved out that my ex-boyfriend did not pay?

I used to live with my ex-boyfriend and I had the electricity in my name; I moved out over a year ago. There wasn’t an issue with the electric being in my name because he was paying it, until the past few months when he started getting behind. I made several attempts to call and try to get it turned over to his name, but was unsuccessful. Then I called and found out the service was disconnected with a balance of $481.16. I cannot afford this, as I am a single mother with no child support. So I was wondering if there was anything that I can do?

Asked on August 26, 2011 Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If the electricity bill was in your name for the unit that was being rented and you then moved out of the rental leaving your former boy friend in the unit and you failed to advise the utility company that you did not want to be on the utility bill form that day forward, you unfortunately are on the hook for the electricty bill totalling $481.16 that your former boy friend did not pay.

Your options at this point is to try to get your former boyfriend to pay this $481.16 amount or work out an agreement with the utility company to pay down the amount on a monthly basis.

In the future, when you are ending an obligation you need to contact the person or entity that the obligation is owed, advise it of the end and follow up with a written commnication confirming the call keeping a written copy for future reference.


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