Can I get into trouble if my bosses stealing time?

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Can I get into trouble if my bosses stealing time?

I am a shift supervisor at my place of work. We have about 6 shift leaders but our big managers are a married couple. The wife is the store manager and her husband is the general manager. Everyday they make the shift supervisor on duty clock them out at 8pm when they really leave at about 2 pm everyday. On some days they don’t even come in at all but make the shift supervisors clock them in and out in the system like they were there. Just last week they took a 3 day weekend vacation and I thought they were using vacation days but I later found out they had my co-workers clocking them in and out and they were never there The wife is on salary pay but her husband is paid hourly just like us. I know what time theft is and am scared of what kind of trouble I can get in for being made to help them do it. They have been the managers so long I don’t even know if anyone would believe me if I told them the truth. I don’t feel comfortable doing this but I’m scared if I don’t I may lose my job or have my hours cut to the point my checks would be next to nothing. I don’t know what to do but I need to know my rights.

Asked on October 15, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Georgia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Yes, you can get in trouble for this: you are helping them to steal time, and so money, from your employer. Yes, you could lose your job if you refuse or speak up against this, but the law does NOT accept fear of losing your job as a valid defense to a criminal act; you are expected to refuse to commit a crime even at the cost of your job. You are therefore their accomplice and could face liability.


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