Can I get the EEOC to force my boss to take a polygraph test?

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Can I get the EEOC to force my boss to take a polygraph test?

My supervisor is a compulsive liar and a very hostile person. He takes full advantage of being friends with top management. I am on medication because of his consistent harassing. I have 35 years of service, and not able to retire. I cannot just up and quit at the present moment until I can make some solid plans. A polygraph test is the only way that i can get people to tell the truth about me because he has inflicted fear making me example. This is very illegal what he is doing. What should I do? I fear him taking my pension.

Asked on February 28, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

1) Polygraphs are almost never admissible in court, so even if there was a cause of action, this would not matter.

2) There is no law saying that a supervisor can't be a liar or hostile; there is no law saying a supervisor can't take advantage of friendship with top management; and the only kind of harassment that is illegal is harassment against an employee because of the employee's race, religion, age over 40, sex, or disability. (Note: an employee in a protected class, such as someone over 40, can be harassed; just they can't be harasssed *because* of their protected status--e.g. because the employee is over 40.)

In short, there does not appear to be a legal remedy for what seems to be an unfortunate, but not uncommon or illegal, situation.


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