Can I get a refund from a select baseball program if the season hasn’t started?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I get a refund from a select baseball program if the season hasn’t started?

We paid $1600 for my 12 year old son to play on a baseball team but the organization promised 8-10 tournaments and never mentioned league play. They have practiced a few times but have yet to step on a baseball field. Now that the

schedule has been released, only 6 tournaments are scheduled and they have signed us up for a league that was never discussed in the parent meeting. In addition, when my husband tried to ask the owner and head coach about the

definite plan for the season, the coach snapped and starting yelling, :I hate parents like you

Asked on February 24, 2017 under Business Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

The hostility or yelling is irrelevant--there is no guaranty or obligation that people with whom you contract with will treat you well, or even courteously.
But breach of contract, IF a contract was breached, can provide grounds to get your money back: so if there was any agreement (oral or written, though obviously written is much better for you: you can much more easily prove the terms and the number of promised tournaments) that you'd get X number of tournaments and that did not provide that, they violated their contract, and that breach can provide grounds to recover your money in a lawsuit (since, if they won't voluntarily repay you, you'd have to sue). The key is, there must provably have been a specific agreement for a certain number of tournaments, which agreement they violated.
(Having league play would not be a contractual violation IF they also had the right number of tournaments: it's not a contractual breach to provide something more than what was promised, as long as the promised thing was provided.)
Fraud can also provide grounds to get your money back, but for there to be fraud, you'd have to show that they intentionally lied in advance about what they would provide, and that may be difficult.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption