Can I force a former girlfriend to give up part ownership of a house if she never paid anything when the house was purchased?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I force a former girlfriend to give up part ownership of a house if she never paid anything when the house was purchased?

A while back I bought a house which I myself paid for in full with cash. The money used to pay for the house came from the sale of land that my brother and I owned jointly (given to us from our parents after they divorced) and then sold. At the time I was feeling generous and put my then girlfriends name on the deed to the house (worst decision ever). A few years later she broke it off with me and I have moved out the house which she still feels entitled to since I put her name on the deed. I want to now sell the house but would like to know if I can legally take her name off of the deed?

Asked on November 19, 2011 under Real Estate Law, North Carolina

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you put your former girlfriend's name on the real property that you are writing about by signing a deed and having it recorded with your county recorder's office, you made a gift to her of whatever interest in the property she now has in it.

Once a gift of real property has been made and fully completed as in your situation, the former girlfriend now has an interest in the real property with you. You cannot legally take her name off the property unless she agrees to it. You might consider making her an offer to buy out her interest in the property.

Likewise, you might consider consulting with a real estate further about your situation.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption