Can I demand that a nursing home feed my mother a certain diet and give her vitamins provided by me?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I demand that a nursing home feed my mother a certain diet and give her vitamins provided by me?

My mother has a type 2 diabetes and was recently admited to a care center. In visiting her I’ve found the food she is eating is full of refined sugars and high in carbs which is very bad for her. I’ve been using specific nutritional supplements and a low carb diet to help her diabetes and Alzheimer’s. She is in the home because she became unable to stand due to a urinary tract infection and we are unable to lift her because of her weight 212-230 lbs. I talked to the head nurse about her diet and supplements and she said I have to wait until next week for the doctor and nutritionist to get back to me. Can they stop me from giving her vitamins myself?

Asked on June 3, 2011 under Malpractice Law, Utah

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Are you your Mother's health care proxy?  Are you her Power of Attorney?  Or conservator?  If you are not then I would strongly consider becoming her conservator at this point in time and very quickly.  If you already have all the documents in place then I would without a doubt making the biggest ruckus you can to have the doctor and nutritionist contact you ASAP.  If she is a diabetic and they are feeding her sugars that could really kill he then I would state that to them point blank.  Call the social worker at the facility and the head of the nursing staff asap.  You really can not give her the supplements yourself as technically she is under the care of a doctor.  Everything need to be properly documented in her chart.  But please, act now.  Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption