Can I collect unemployment if I have to quit my job due to medical issues?

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Can I collect unemployment if I have to quit my job due to medical issues?

FMLA now for reduced hours witha leave for pain clinic for 8 weeks coming up in 2-3 weeks due to fibro and arthritis pain. Sick, personal, and vacation will be exhausted this week. Doctor’s notes are from chiropractor. Also, broke my toe at work and because of limping my back went out. Workers comp is fighting that the back injury is related to the broken toe. Going for MRI this week but may be unable to work on my feet part-time. Having major pain issues with reduced hours. What are my options; I need money to live.

Asked on September 18, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, Minnesota

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

I am sorry for your condition.  I would suggest that you seek help from an employment or disability attorney in your area.  From what I have read about the unemployment law in the state of Minnesota, you are not eligible to collect unemployment benefits if you have a physical or medical condition that prevents you from working or looking for work.  But that does not mean that you could not collect under your employers disability policy instead of in fact you were certified as being disabled to work.  So I think that it would be best for you to look in to that option here (and possibly Social Security disability benefits as well).  Good luck.


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