Can I challenge my ticket in court?

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Can I challenge my ticket in court?

I live in Arizona, i was coming home from work
on mount Lemmon, and it was snowing. I feel I
was going less than 20mph but the ticket says
25 in a 35. Well trying to slow down my brakes
locked up and I slammed into a guard rail. The
ticket is ‘failure to control speed and avoid
accident’ I can’t afford the traffic school, or the
fine, but I don’t feel like I should be held
accountable. The workers didn’t plow the
roads, and the damages aren’t even bad. Can
you give me some advice please? Thank you

Asked on March 28, 2016 under Accident Law, Arizona

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Even if the road was unplowed, you were at fault, since whatever the road conditions were, you should have been driving at the appropriate speed and also driving appropriately to conditions (e.g. pumping brakes and decelerating slowly): so if under those conditions, the safe speed was only 10 mph, that's the speed you should have going. Therefore, you are highly unlikely to "beat" the ticket, since by gettng out of control, you prove the ticket. 
However, if you otherwise have a clean record and are calm, contrite, and respectful, there is a very good chance that the prosecutor will offer you a deal under which you plead to a lesser offense (less fines and/or less points). Speak to the prosecutor when you first get to court and focus on getting a good deal by stressing your clean record, how sorry you are, etc. and not on being confrontational and trying to prove that the officer was wrong to ticket you.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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