Can I be sued for a house I’ve owned for almost 2 years by the former owners child?

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Can I be sued for a house I’ve owned for almost 2 years by the former owners child?

I have owned a home in the state of Nevada for almost 2 years recently the prior owner passed away and now their child is trying to sue me for the house claiming that it wasn’t signed over legally but it was done under a quit claim deed in front of the county assessor. I even just recently got finished in court evicting squatters that were on the property and it was proven in court that I was the legal owner. The home was originally signed over to me in my now ex-wife by her grandmother approximately 4 months ago my ex-wife signed over her half of the house to me upon trying to evict the people that were living on the property the aunt got involved and is now going to sue to get the house back.

Asked on December 9, 2017 under Real Estate Law, Nevada

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Yes, she can bring the lawsuit in the sense that the child, as someone who presumably would have inherited had the house not been transferred to you, has "standing" (a sufficient legally recognizable interest) to challenge the deed. IF the child can prove that the deed was void, she can undo it.
However, while she can bring the lawsuit (the courts do not prescreen lawsuits for validity--therefore, as long as a lawsuit on its face appears to state a legitimate question or issue, it can initially be brought), if the county assessor oversaw or approved the transfer *and* your ownership was accepted by the court in the legal action to remove squatters, it is *very* unlikely that she would be able to prove that the transfer was invalid.


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