Can I be sued for the outstanding balance owed on a loan for a wedding ring ifI didn’t sign any of the loan papers?

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Can I be sued for the outstanding balance owed on a loan for a wedding ring ifI didn’t sign any of the loan papers?

When me and my wife decided to get engaged neither one of us had the credit to get an engagement/wedding ring. Her grandfather went to the jewelers and bought the ring with his credit. I then picked the ring up and gave it to my fiance. We ended up getting married and are now going through a divorce. She took the ring with her. Her grandfather called me saying that he was filing a claim in small claims court for $4500 which is left on the ring. My name is no where on the loan papers nor do I have the ring. Can he do this? And if so what steps should I take?

Asked on August 1, 2011 Arkansas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Your soon to be former wife's grandfather bought the engagement ring that you ended up giving to her. Was his payment for the ring a gift to you and your soon to be former wife, or did he buy the ring expecting you to pay him back for it?

Most likely the grandfather bought the ring for you expecting repayment of the $4,500.00 purchase price from you. It makes no sense for the grandfather to buy an engagement ring for his own granddaughter since the ring should be coming from the man who asked the woman to marry him.

The grandfather has an expectation that you were to repay him for the ring. The divorce is forcing him to protect his granddaughter. You should start paying off the wedding ring that you gave to your wife.


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