Can I be held accountable for the incorrect mileage on a car’s title after trading it in?

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Can I be held accountable for the incorrect mileage on a car’s title after trading it in?

I traded in my vehicle at a local car dealership. The title I gave them, at the time of the transfer said the vehicle was at an actual 100,000 but the Power of Attorney I signed had an odometer disclosure of 50,000 actual miles. The descrepency between the title and car’s milage happened because when I completed the title work for my car, I didn’t have it with me, so I just guessed the mileage. Now, 3 months later, they are telling me I need to come in and sign a new power of attorney, stating that the actual mileage of the vehicle is not 50,000. And that since I registered the title with an actual mileage of 100,000 I committed a federal offense.

Asked on July 8, 2012 under General Practice, Colorado

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

I suggest that you consult with an attorney that practices in the area of automotive law before signing any document that the car dealership now wishes you to sign for the simple reason that the document you previously signed may have been under the penalty of perjury and the one requested to be signed may also be under the penalty of perjury.

If you sign the second one which is in conflict with the first, you very well could have serious issues later on with respect to the representations that you made to the dealership when you traded in your former car as to price given to you based upon 50,000 versus 100,000 miles where you could be held accountable for the discrepancy.


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