Can I be charged with hit and run if I did not realize that I hit a parked car until I was notified by an police officer?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I be charged with hit and run if I did not realize that I hit a parked car until I was notified by an police officer?

The other night I was leaving my friend’s house during a storm. I drive a truck; it’s a massive vehicle. The following night I was over at my friends and as I was getting in my car to leave I was asked to call the police about a vehicle accident. A couple days prior my car was backed into by a different person on the street, which knock my back tail light out. I contacted the officer thinking I was calling him regarding that accident. I was informed that there was white paint from my car on another car and black paint from that car on mine. I have insurance. What will happen?

Asked on June 5, 2011 under Criminal Law, Missouri

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Ok so you had no idea that you hit the other vehicle?  Really?  Then call you insurance company and report the accident as soon as you possibly can.  If you really have a good explanation for the entire event then you can just file an accident report.  The insurance company will investigate the claim.  The issue with insurance companies disclaiming coverage is generally late notification from insured drivers or a failure to cooperate in a litigation or investigation.  If the insurance company gives you a hard time seek legal consultation.  And maybe you should reconsider the vehicle that you drive. This one may be too much to handle.  Too many accidents and you will lose coverage I am sure.  Good luck. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption