Can charges be dropped when a officer has harassed you?

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Can charges be dropped when a officer has harassed you?

I have been slandered and harassed by a
county officer. He has parked across
from my house for hours. Also has
talked down about me to people in the
town. Has pulled me over for a false
traffic stop. Has called k9 to search
my vehicle. There was nothing in my
vehicle. Then the following week. Has
state police and county there around my
neighborhood. They pulled me over and
made me get out of vehicle and was
charged with multiple charges.

Asked on November 11, 2016 under Criminal Law, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

These are largely two different issues: 
1) If you did things that justify the charges, then you may be charged whether or not an officer harassed you: the issue in regards to your charges is whether there is evidence to support them. IF the only evidence is this one officer's testimony, then if you can show that he is biased against you, you can weaken or eliminate the evidence; but if there is evidence independent of him, his motives or action have little or no bearing.
2) If the officer is harassing you in his official capacity (as an officer of the law; e.g. the false traffic stop), you could file a complaint against him with his department and/or sue him. And if he is stalking or harassing or defaming you in his personal capacity, you may be able to sue him for those things. If you wish to explore these options, consult with an attorney in detail.
Again, though, his harassment of you and your wrongdoing, if you did things supporting the charges, do not cancel each other out; you could be charged, even convicted, even if you have valid claims against him.


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