Can an employer find out about a class action lawsuit I filed?

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Can an employer find out about a class action lawsuit I filed?

If so, how can I get it removed from my record? How can I “check” my own record? I filed a lawsuit in CA state (class action) overtime laws and am now concerned that is going to affect my future employment. It took me 3 months to get a job with a masters degree and a couple months after being hired, they started sending out e-mails and changing policies surrounding the lawsuit I had filed with the prior company.

Asked on March 27, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Washington

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I can tell how nervous you are and I can tell that you are really fearful of losing your job.  But take it from me: one has nothing to do with the other.  Employers can not fire you for standing up to employers that cheat you. Can they find out about the lawsuit?  Well, yes I guess that they can by running your name through the court system (class action suits are generally known by the name of the first named plaintiff in the matter).  And you can also do the same in the county in which it was filed.  If it was filed Federally then in the Federal Courts.  Who, may I ask, is sending around e-mails about the policy?  Your new firm?  Based upon the lawsuit in which you took part?  And the e-mails are what: negative in some way?  If the policy change was to be in compliance with the law as it evolved through the suit then really you should be commended.  You can not "remove" your name.  I would relax, though, until something adverse comes from the matter.  Good luck.


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