Can an employer change policy and not notify employees?

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Can an employer change policy and not notify employees?

The company I worked for gave me the policies on CD when I started. It states that after 1 year, employees get 2 weeks vacation and 1 personal day. A month ago I requested and got a personal day off for a medical issue.
I was terminated 2 weeks ago. I was paid 72 hrs. of vacation time because I had taken 1 day. When I pointed out the policy I was told that the policy was old and had been changed. I was emailed a new policy that did not include the personal day. I was told that the new policy had been handed out at our last meeting.
2 other policy changes were handed out at that meeting but not that one. I spoke with the others at the meeting and no one has a copy of the new policy. I checked emails and texts and have no evidence of receiving the new policy. I have asked for a record of being notified of the change but I have received only silence.

Asked on May 7, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

A policy change is only effective when employees are notified; it is effective from the moment of notification onward or forward. Until employees receive notice of a new or changed policy, the pre-existing or old policy remains in force. Notice is required for the change.


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