Can an apartment manager threaten to evict a renter if the renter sought medical attention for an injury that happened on the rental property?

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Can an apartment manager threaten to evict a renter if the renter sought medical attention for an injury that happened on the rental property?

I was injured by cactus as I was walking along the walkway. When I went to the rental office to seek help from the apartment manager, she tried to help me remove the cactus needles. However she couldn’t remove all of them. I mentioned going to the hospital, and she informed me that she will evict me if I sought medical help. My hand is swollen, in extreme pain, to the point that I cannot use my hand; it is the primary hand I use. What should I do? I can’t afford medical expenses nor can I afford to be evicted.

Asked on February 9, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Arizona

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

She had absolutely no right to tell you that she would evict you for seeking medical attention for an injury that occurred on the property.  That is not grounds for eviction anywhere. First, get yourself to a hospital immediately.  You do not want to risk any permanent damage to your hand.  Once that is cleared up file a complaint with the property owner as to the manager, and make sure that you file an incident report as to the occurrence.  Were there any witnesses to what she said and to your being in the office that day?  Take their names to an attorney to discuss the matter.  If the injury was as a result of the negligence of the owner and manager then you can possibly be compensated.  And if her statement caused additional injury because you were fearful to get medical attention, tell the lawyer that too.  Good luck.


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