Can an adult living with their guardians call the police if they are physically harmed?

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Can an adult living with their guardians call the police if they are physically harmed?

I am 19 years old and live with my aunt and uncle. My uncle has been physically abusive as well as emotionally abusive throughout my childhood. There have been occasions where his “spankings” became “beatings” that left me and my younger sister bruised very badly and significantly. Recently he has begun to threaten to hurt me badly among other things. What I want to know is now that I am a legal adult, if he threatens to or attempts to cause me bodily harm by hitting me, do I have the right to call the police and get protection, even if they are my “guardians”?

Asked on September 17, 2011 under Criminal Law, Georgia

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Oh my goodness.  Absolutely yes.  Do not hesitate to call the police guardians or not.  You have taken far too much at this point in time and you do not have to take any more.  Now, how old is your sister?  You are technically considered an adult at this point in time but I am worried for her.  Your situation as to schooling or a job, etc., was not disclosed.  Are there other family members that you can go to for help and who may take your little sister in with them?  I a worried that she will be taken and placed in to foster care.  You can apply yourself to be her guardian but you need to be in a stable home with a stale job, etc. in order for the court to take you seriously.  And if you are in school we do not want to have you stop.  Please find another adult that you trust to help you.  Good luck.


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