Can an adult be sued for medical bills that were incurred when they were a minor?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can an adult be sued for medical bills that were incurred when they were a minor?

My son, who is 20 years-old, had a wrist injury when he was 16. My estranged husband was responsible for this medical bill however the balance owed was never paid. The attorney/debt collector is now suing my son now that he is 20. The attorney/debt collector is a bully and read statutes over the phone telling my son how he was now responsible. Can my adult son be sued for a medical bill that he incurred as a minor, how is this right?

Asked on October 15, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Florida

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

The attorney/debt collector is operating in dangerous territory.  Reading the statutes is not necessarily against the law but implying that he will be arrested, etc., can be.  What do you mean by bullying?  Let me tell you that under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act a debt collector can get in to a lot of trouble by using tactics to scare or intimidate a person. An attorney can get in to far greater trouble with the local bar association as well.  I would familiarize yourself with the act in order to arm yourself against his calls.  If he is in violation the report him.  As for the debt owed, it is a contract for services rendered.  Yes, it is true that your son was a minor at the time but he is now an adult.  Was your estranged husband listed in the hospital as the responsible party?  I would ask someone to review the claim for you and see if it is viable even statutorily with the statute of limitations.  Good luck. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption