Can a respondent in a harassment restraining order petition the courts to shorten the time of the order?

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Can a respondent in a harassment restraining order petition the courts to shorten the time of the order?

My ex-boyfriend of 3 years had me arrested after a brief argument. I was charged with disorderly conduct. There was no violence or threats at all. I was trying to talk to him. He then had a harassment restraining order placed on me. I had never been arrested before, I’m 52 years old. I never threatened to harm him or anything like that. The judge placed a 4 year long restraining order on me. That was 1 1/2 years ago. This seems very excessive to me. I would like to know if I can petition the court to shorten the time on it. Do I have a chance of getting this done?

Asked on August 5, 2011 Wisconsin

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Speak with an attorney in your area to be sure about your options here but generally speaking,  you really may have no way to reduce the time that the court has set.  It does sound like the time that has been set by the court is a bit excessive but there must have been some evidence presented on his part at the hearing that gave the court a basis for the decision.  I think it would be best for you to stay as far away from him as you can and to adhere to the order.  Otherwise he can have you hauled off to jail for violating the order. That would really not be good.  Good luck to you. 


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