Can a police officer stop a junior licensed driver if he is suspected of having too many unrelated passengers in his vehicle?

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Can a police officer stop a junior licensed driver if he is suspected of having too many unrelated passengers in his vehicle?

Asked on May 28, 2013 under Uncategorized, Pennsylvania

Answers:

Joyce Sweinberg / Joyce J. Sweinberg Associates PC

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

I think he can stop the junior licensed driver to make a determination as to whether the driver is complying with Act 81.  MY son just got his junior license and I have been reminding him of this rule.  See the text below from the PA DMV site:

Act 81 places increased restrictions on the number and age of passengers which a junior driver license holder may transport. Current law limits drivers under the age of 18 to transporting no more passengers than the number of seat belts in the vehicle.

As of Dec. 27, 2011, for the first six months after receiving their junior driver’s license, a driver is not permitted to have more than one passenger under age 18 who is not an immediate family member (brother, sister, stepbrother, stepsister of the junior driver and adopted or foster children living in the same household as the junior driver) in their vehicle unless they are accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. If they have not been convicted of a driving violation or been partially or fully responsible for a reportable crash after six months, they may have up to three passengers under age 18 who are not immediate family members without a parent or legal guardian present. If they have any convictions or are partially or fully responsible for a reportable crash while a junior driver, they are once again restricted to one passenger.   http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/teenDriversCenter/newTeenDriversLaw.shtml

 


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