Can a police officer pull me over and then make me drive somewhere else to give me a citation?

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Can a police officer pull me over and then make me drive somewhere else to give me a citation?

Is a misunderstanding of a police wave disobedience? People were taking turns directing traffic at an intersection. The officer waved for me to turn left. As I was turning they jumped in front of my car and I signaled with my hands that I was confused. So the officer waved with the back of his hand. I took that as him saying to just forget it and go. I got gas and pizza on the same street. In the drive-thru of the pizza place an officer walked up to my window and told me to pull over. Then he took my ID, made me drive back to the intersection, and said that said that I was tole told to pull over. Hew cited me with disobeying an officer. This doesn’t seem right. Can they do this?

Asked on March 7, 2011 under General Practice, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Two different issues here:

Legally, can you be cited for disobeying an officer's traffic instructions? Yes. And similarly, legally an officer can make you drive a short distance for him to write you up, such as to get you out of traffic or away from danger, or to get you closer to his vehicle (where he has his computer, radio, supplies, etc.--this is probably what he was doing, though it's hard to be sure from what you write).

Factually, did you do constitute disobedience? Maybe yes, maybe no. If you feel that you were not disobeying the officer and the facts would bear you out, retain a defense counsel to represent you and challenge the citation.


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