can a landlord put in a lease anything that makes the tenant give up his rights by state law in tennessee?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

can a landlord put in a lease anything that makes the tenant give up his rights by state law in tennessee?

i rented a house on may 1,2009 and paid a $400.00 rent and $400.00 deposit. i was laid off my job on june 4th. i told my landlord i would be out by the first of july. on june 20th the landlord went into the house and removed all of my belongings, changed the locks, and stored my stuff 200 miles away in a storage building they have at their house. They gave me no warnings, no eviction notice. It did state in my lease that i gave up my rights to a 30 day notice of eviction. Is this legal? Can they even take my mail? I also had some cash there and they took it too. Is theis legal?

Asked on June 22, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Tennessee

Answers:

J.M.A., Member in Good Standing of the Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

I  am a lawyer in CT and practice in this area of the law.  The situation you describe is completely unlawful.  The landlord may not do these things without a judicial order by the court.  You simply giving notice of your intent to vacate the property is not grounds for removing personal property and eliminating access thereto.  I suggest obtaining a lawyer to sue the landlord for damages, including reimbursement of your atty fees.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption