Can a grantor that has signed a quit claim deed be added back onto a title by the Grantee

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can a grantor that has signed a quit claim deed be added back onto a title by the Grantee

My mother had me added as a co-owner on the house she owned. Because of
medical issues she had to be put into a nursing home and later an assisted living
facility. None of us knew if she was going to pull through, so she signed a quit
claim deed granting me her share of the house. Against all odds, she has
recovered a good deal of her faculties. She still needs to have some form of
assisted living, but she is a lot more sound to make decisions now. I would like
to have her name back on the deed as co-owner, but I just want to make sure
that is possible before proceeding.

Asked on September 8, 2019 under Real Estate Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

Yes, you can quit claim half your interest in the home to her, the same way she quit claimed her interest to you. You are basically simply undoing what she did. Bear in mind that if Medicaid paid for any part of her medical care, Medicaid (i.e. the state) may have a claim against the home to secure reimbursement, since it was only transferred when she need the care (and which transfer could therefore be undone by Medicaid, which can undo transfers which were not for fair market value, if done less than 5 years before Medicaid had to pay costs); it's possible that therefore that neither of you will have the home free and clear.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption