Can a doctor refuse to examine a child because they are homeschool?

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Can a doctor refuse to examine a child because they are homeschool?

I have a soon-to-be 7 year old son with ADHD and Autism. Due to this, I

had decided, along with his clinical psychologist, that we would homeschool

while he was learning to navigate his world. My child’s pediatrician seems to

believe that this was the wrong choice and has refused to even hear out any of my concerns since the decision was made. I took my son in because of mobility concerns running into walls, only able to walk for around 15 minutes and his doctor informed me that my child needed to be enrolled in public school and referred me to a ADHD specialist in the next state over. My son is seeing a psychiatrist for this already and didn’t even glance at my son other then to check his ears, throat and shine a light in his eyes. There are no other available pediatricians in this area and it’s starting to cause my whole family stress. Does my son’s doctor have a right to bring his personal opinion into this? Is he allowed to ignore my concerns?

Asked on October 30, 2018 under Malpractice Law, Mississippi

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Yes, a physician may refuse to see a child for this reason. In this country, seeing a doctor is not a right; doctors are essentially private businesses and like other private businesses, have considerable discretion in whom they will treat or see as customers (patients). Add to that a doctor's right to not support or endorse conduct which he or she believes is unhealthy or inappropriate--and this doctor clearly does believe that you homeschooling is wrong--and the doctor may refuse to see your child for this reason.


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