Can a disputed landlord charge remain on your credit report?

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Can a disputed landlord charge remain on your credit report?

In 2007, I moved out of an apartment I had lived in for 1 year. Upon move out, I did everything required per the lease, including having the carpets professionally cleaned at my expense. Several months after move out, I received a letter from them stating they were charging me over $900 to replace the carpeting. There was no damage to the carpeting, beyond normal wear and tear. It was the cheap commercial grade carpeting used in standard apartment complexes to begin with. It is now on my credit report. What are my options?

Asked on June 25, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Arizona

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Was there a judgment against you for the $900.00? If not, the negative reference on your credit report as to the $900.00 is simply a claim. If a claim, you need to contact the credit reporting agency and see what can be done to eliminate the negative reference on your report. Potentially it might be voluntarily removed if the $900 is not a judgment but a claim only or if the $900 was a judgment, you have paid it off.

Another course to take is to possibly consult with a credit repair company to see what could be done to remove the disputed charge from your credit card. 

The last option is to write the former landlord about the situation advsing him/her that your credit has been damaged solely by a claim for money and that he/she needs to remove the disputed charge from the credit reporting company or you might be consulting with an attorney about the subject.


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