Can a college charge a member of the military out-of-state tuitionif they are a legal resident of that state but duty stationed in a different state?

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Can a college charge a member of the military out-of-state tuitionif they are a legal resident of that state but duty stationed in a different state?

I am taking on-line courses through a community college in MS. I’m a legal resident of that state but am stationed in another with the US Air Force. Now, in the middle of the semester, the college has started contacting me about upping my tuition for the current semester to the out-of-state rates. I informed them of my legal residency, sent a copy of my current  driver’s license, and documentation on the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. They state that this is not enough and is requiring more documentation. Before I get too far into a battle, I want to know what my legal options are?

Asked on October 17, 2011 under Business Law, Alabama

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The college that you are attending can attempt to charge you out of state tuition under the pretense that you are not a legal resident of that state. For your college to be successful it its claim, it has to prove that you are not a resident of that state.

In order to respond to the claims for increased tuition for being a non-resident of the state where you are taking courses, in addition to providing your school with your driver's license, you need to provide your car registration, voter registration and remind the school about the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act.

One's residency is the place where one deems his or her home on a permamnet basis.

Good luck.


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