can a business let me go after they hired me?

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can a business let me go after they hired me?

Was hired after 3 weeks of interviewing, background checks, etc. The hospital knew I was a new grad NP and what specialty I graduated in but because I have years of experience as a critical care nurse the director felt I was a great fit. Well, I’ve been here every weekday for the last 3 weeks and now I’m just hearing the chief of cardiology is questioning my experience in cardiology and wants to meet with the rest of the medical staff to decide whether or not they’ll approve my privileges to practice which I need before I can fully practice. If they don’t approve it is it legal for them to just let me go? The whole process started in April and my actual start date was May 23red, I thought if the hospital opened a position they would’ve had all the logistics figured out but it seems like theyre not even sure. What are my options?

Asked on June 7, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Most employment is what is known as "at will", which means that an employer can set the conditions of the workplace much as it sees fit. This includes terminating a new hire. This is true so long as the discharge does not violate the terms of a union contract or employment agreement. Also, the employee's treatment must not constitute some form of legally actionable discrimination. Additionally, as a new hire, if you did something significant to your detriment in reliance on the promise of employment, you could possibly hold your employer accountable. That having been said, in order to prevail it would require something like relocating for the job, leaving an existing job for this one, etc. If this was the case, you should consult directly with an employment law attorney who can best advise you further. The legal theory they would try to proceed on would be "promissory estoppel"; means that someone can be stopped from denying a promise. It is also known as "detrimental reliance", sincea eprson relied to their detriment on the promise.


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