Can a business charge me even though they provided no service because they say that I never canceled?

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Can a business charge me even though they provided no service because they say that I never canceled?

Approximately 3 months ago I began contacting salons to obtain quotes for someone to do my hair and my bridal parties hair for my wedding. I received a quote from a salon for $45 per brides maid (I had 3) and $45 for myself (Bride) and they said they would charge “around $15” for my flower girl. I ended up calling them back the end of June from my work phone (which I no longer have as I no longer work for the same company) and canceled. They now claim I never called and charged me over $400 to a card that had been closed (they forced the transaction through). Is this legal?

Asked on August 5, 2011 Iowa

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

First what you need to do is to disputethe charge on the card.  Did you sign any contract with them?  Although verbal contracts can indeed be binding it is much harder to prove.  Why did they have a charge card on file for you anyway?  In order to make a claim that you cancelled you are in fact going to have to admit that there was a verbal agreement, which it seems that there was and you claim was cancelled.  It is going to be your word against theirs and you are going to need proof of cancellation. Try and get something as to it.  Once you finish disputing the card they are going to sue you.  So you are going to need it either way.  Good luck.


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