Can a bank finance a doublewide with no title?

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Can a bank finance a doublewide with no title?

We purchased a 73 doublewide, completely remodeled on an acre lot 5 years ago. when the bank did the financing and the lawyers did all the paperwork, they left out the title work. So we have no title to the doublewide. We contacted the previous owner and got no where, the bank was no help on getting the title. We would like to sell and buy a bigger home, but we are stuck. How could we get a title? and could we take legal action against the bank?

Asked on July 22, 2011 West Virginia

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

In order to get registered title to the mobile home, contact the department of motor vehicles in your State. Most mobile homes are registered as "vehicles". You need to find the serial number of the mobile home to provide to the department of motor vehicles to find its last registered owner for ttile transfer. Your former attorney should be able to assist.

It seems that you bought the mobile home and some land. Most likely the loan was secured by the land, but you need to check the loan documents to see if the mobile home is also security for the loan.

Your prior attorney needs to contact the prior owners of the land and mobile home you bought for copies of all paper work for the mobile home to place it in your name as the registered owner. A letter from your attorney might get more of a response from the prior owners than the attempts you made.

I see no basis for an action against the bank. The bank did not sell you the mobile home.The prior owners did. You might have an action against them if your contract for purchase was to receive registered title to the mobile home.


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