Can a 17 year old that is pregnant move out and get her own place without her parents’ permission?

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Can a 17 year old that is pregnant move out and get her own place without her parents’ permission?

I’m 17 and 2 months pregnant my guardians (both of my parents are dead) won’t let me go and I want to get emancipated but they say I’ll never get it. I have a truck that’s paid off but no license a permit from Mississippi and I have no job but I get a check each month over $1000 a month till I graduate from my late father. Do I have a chance of getting emancipated? Also can I hire a lawyer being under age and can I stay at a friends house until the court date?

Asked on February 5, 2011 under Family Law, Arkansas

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Is is possible to have a court order allowing you to move out.  However, you would have to prove that you had a job (not just a monthly check that will stop upon your graduation), a safe place to stay, and various other factors that the court would require.  Just because you are pregnant doesn't automatically emancipate you.  As for staying at you friend's until the court date, you could only stay with your guardians' permission.

Finally, yes you can hire a lawyer to represent you , if you can afford it.  Although there are free/low cost legal services available for cases like this - Legal Aid, a law school clinic, and attorneys who work "pro bono" (i.e. for free).  However, you didn't state just when you turned 17.  If you will be 18 in just a few months than you at that time you will be of "the age of majority" (i.e. legally an adult).  So if you wait you can save yourself all of the legal hassles.  Not to mention that this type of case can take months, so you might turn 18 before the case is even decided.


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