If a business owner illegally towed my vehicle from their private property, can I file a police report against them and have them pay to get vehicle out of impound?

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If a business owner illegally towed my vehicle from their private property, can I file a police report against them and have them pay to get vehicle out of impound?

My tire blew out on my vehicle. I left in the parking lot driveway with a note stating I would return for it. No sign were posted about do not park or will tow. Several hours later I returned fire vehicle and it was gone. I asked business if they towed it and they said no. At the time it was under construction, now it’s not. I filed a police report,they checked their system and said they didn’t tow it. Several days later police called saying they found it in another city impounded. The impound lot said the business owner had it towed. Can we legally press charges against the owner for denying they towed it off and make them pay for getting my vehicle out of impound?

Asked on May 14, 2019 under General Practice, Oklahoma

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

You write that you left your vehicle in the parking lot "driveway": that is, based on what you write, you left it in a place where nothing should be parked, where it potentially created a hazard (if someone turned into the driveway without checking to see if a car was there) and where it could obstruct the business's customers and staff. They had every right to tow a vehicle in a potentially hazardous location where it could also interefere with their business, and your note that you'd return for it did not give you any right to leave the vehicle there: you simply do not have the right to obstruct their driveway. Since their towing was proper, you do not have recourse against them.


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