billing for past services

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billing for past services

I started my own landscaping business last spring. In the beginning I was working with a potential client about a landscaping project for her new home. I met with her several times, gave her several revised estimates as well as designed blueprints and spent nearly 20 hours of my time working with her. She ended up not doing any business with us. I advertised free estimates but not CAD designs or consulting but in an interest to build a good reputation and relationships I chose not to send her a bill.
She is now harassing me about money I ‘owe’ her in an unrelated issue. Her case is not valid and she is threatening to take me to small claims court.
My question is, Can I bill her for all the time and design work I did for her?

Asked on November 4, 2016 under Business Law, Wyoming

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If at the time, you told her that you would not bill her for the work, you can't bill  her now: you can't go back on or change what was then agreed to. If you did not agree to not bill her for those services *and* she understood (or at least was told by you) that you were doing work for which she could be invoiced, then you may bill her now and, if she does not pay, could sue her for the money, since you are still well within your state's "statute of limitions," or time within which you must bring a legal action.


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