What to do if I was accused of stealing, forced into a confession and fined $80?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if I was accused of stealing, forced into a confession and fined $80?

They said they had cameras monitoring us in the back room where i worked and had no knowledge of this prior to their interrogation of me. My job may be in jeopardy and I felt threatened into admitting guilt for something I didn’t do. I read that state law doesn’t let them monitor me in the workplace without my consent. Do they have a right to do this?

Asked on August 3, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Employers may video monitor the worksite, other than areas like changing rooms, bathrooms, etc. (There are limitations on audio monitoring, however.) More to the point, the law does not recognize being "pressured" into a signing an agreement like this with a private employer in most cases. If you felt the agreement was unjust, unfair, incorrect, etc., you could have refused to sign it (and consulted with an attorney, if appropriate, after refusing to sign it). It is not impossible, but very hard, to overturn an agreement which you have signed, since your signature is presumed to have been voluntary. Based on what you write, it is most likely that 1) you can be held to the fine you agreed to and 2) you could be terminated at your employer's option. The exception would be if you had an employment agreement (including union contract) which gave you due process rights or spelled out some procedure for discipline and termination; if so, you could enforce that contract, if it helps you.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Employers may video monitor the worksite, other than areas like changing rooms, bathrooms, etc. (There are limitations on audio monitoring, however.) More to the point, the law does not recognize being "pressured" into a signing an agreement like this with a private employer in most cases. If you felt the agreement was unjust, unfair, incorrect, etc., you could have refused to sign it (and consulted with an attorney, if appropriate, after refusing to sign it). It is not impossible, but very hard, to overturn an agreement which you have signed, since your signature is presumed to have been voluntary. Based on what you write, it is most likely that 1) you can be held to the fine you agreed to and 2) you could be terminated at your employer's option. The exception would be if you had an employment agreement (including union contract) which gave you due process rights or spelled out some procedure for discipline and termination; if so, you could enforce that contract, if it helps you.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption