How does one going about dissolving a Board of Trustees in order to incorporate?

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How does one going about dissolving a Board of Trustees in order to incorporate?

As the acting Senior Warden for the church to which I belong, I’ve been tasked with incorporating the same. While I’ve begun to do my homework on that item, there remains this question: What to do about the current “legal” arrangement under which the church exits (i.e. a Board of Trustees). No one seems to know where documents regarding this are. There’s only one known member of said board active in the church. Must one formally dissolve the Trust, or can one simply proceed with incorporation, with the intent that that would replace the trusteeship?

Asked on May 12, 2014 under Business Law, Virginia

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

You first must find the documents that exist for the Board of Trustees to go about the process of terminating its status. If there are none, then a notice needs to be sent to all concerned as to the intent to terminate this board and then incorporate where a meeting is held, vote made and if passed by a majority then proceed as desired there minutes are made with signatures for all that attended as a paper trail.


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