What to do if as a personal trainer, I want to form a charity to collect donations to provide training and diet services to the under-privileged?

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What to do if as a personal trainer, I want to form a charity to collect donations to provide training and diet services to the under-privileged?

My goal is to serve these people and to give my donors a tax deduction. Am I allowed by the IRS to provide these services in addition to those I would hire?

Asked on July 21, 2014 under Business Law, New York

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

Do you mean a 501(c)(3) organization under the IRS code? You must be forming it for "exempt purposes." The exempt purposes set forth in section 501(c)(3) are charitable, religious, educational, scientific, literary, testing for public safety, fostering national or international amateur sports competition, and preventing cruelty to children or animals.  The term charitable is used in its generally accepted legal sense and includes relief of the poor, the distressed, or the underprivileged; advancement of religion; advancement of education or science; erecting or maintaining public buildings, monuments, or works; lessening the burdens of government; lessening neighborhood tensions; eliminating prejudice and discrimination; defending human and civil rights secured by law; and combating community deterioration and juvenile delinquency. New York - the state you listed here - also has requirements.  I am going to give you two links to help but I would speak with an attorney in person.  Good luck.

http://www.irs.gov/Charities-&-Non-Profits/Charitable-Organizations/Exemption-Requirements-Section-501(c)(3)-Organizations

http://www.charitiesnys.com/pdfs/how_to_incorporate.pdf



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