Are casinos considered establishments who’s primary purpose is the sale of alcohol?

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Are casinos considered establishments who’s primary purpose is the sale of alcohol?

Before court my lawyer told me that one of the conditions of my unsupervised probation would be no bars/liqueur stores/casinos. However, the “Special Conditions of Probation” check off list that the judge filled in simply states, “Not to enter establishments whose primary purpose is the sale or distribution of alcohol.” Obviously bars and liqueur stores fit this definition. Does this really apply to casinos or were my lawyer’s and/or prosecutor’s notes incorrect? Isn’t a casino’s primary purpose gaming and their primary source of income?

Asked on July 13, 2010 under Criminal Law, Missouri

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I can see how you have distinguished the characterizations of the establishments listed as against the checklist provided.  And although I agree with the distinction made, I would be leery to go against what your attorney and the Prosecutor have told you until there is further clarification.  My fear is that the checklist is outdated and the cautionary statement is the new "law" in effect regarding your condition of probation.  Call and double check with your attorney and ask him or her about your concerns. Ask ask why if he or she tells you the same answer. You have a right to know and he or she is the one to tell you. Good luck.   


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