Do I have any recourse if I made alterations to an apartment but they underwent management changes and claim they have no records of being given notice?

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Do I have any recourse if I made alterations to an apartment but they underwent management changes and claim they have no records of being given notice?

I took off broken sliding doors in a bedroom in an old apartment, notified the office that I was storing the removed doors on the “top” of the storage area in the basement that was ours to use as part of our lease. These doors disappeared at move-out, they claim to have no record of being notified and no idea as to where the doors went. I have no proof and nothing in writing from them acknowledging that the broken doors they claimed they couldn’t repair were stored down there. They’re charging for completely rebuilding closet doors due to “age” since they can’t be replaced. What can I do?

Asked on June 20, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The best way to try and resolve the situation that you are writing about is to have a face to face meeting with the landlord or his property manager about the repairs that you made where records for such have been lost to try and resolve the issue. You learned a valuable lesson with respect to making copies of important documents for future use and need.

Your options if you cannot resolve the situation to your satisfaction as to the repairs is to not pay what the landlord demands and see if he or she will take you to small clains court, enter into a compromise for the amount claimed owed or pay the full demand.


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