If a 17 year-old mother wants to move out, canher parents call the cops?

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If a 17 year-old mother wants to move out, canher parents call the cops?

My brother’s girlfriend is 17 and turns 18 in 2 months. My brother, who is 18, has been offered a $28 an hour job in CA with my mother’s firm. He wants to take his baby and his 17 year old girlfriend with him. She will enroll in school there and take care of their baby there as well. They will live in my mother’s house until they have enough money to live on their own. Her mother has told her if she tries to leave before she is 18 (2 months) she will press charges on her and call the cops. What can she do so her parents cant get her in trouble?

Asked on August 10, 2011 Ohio

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Here is the problem:  Ohio has no method or manner of becoming emancipated as a minor.  And honestly, the process - if permitted - would probably take more time than the two months here when she will turn 18.  Now there are two ways that a minor can indeed get out of the custody of their parents in Ohio: join the army or get married. Of course again there is a catch here.  While 16 year old girls can indeed marry in Ohio, girls under 18 need the consent of a parent to do so.  I gather from what you have written that her Mother is not going to consent.  I really think that what she should do is to wait until she turns 18.  Although 2 months may seem like a long time it really passes quickly.  In the meantime your brother can move to California and work really hard the next few months to establish himself at your Mother's firm and prepare the home for the coming of the baby and his girlfriend.  Good luck to them.  


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