What can I do if an employer contractually agreed to re-imburse my expenses but has refused to do so?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What can I do if an employer contractually agreed to re-imburse my expenses but has refused to do so?

I worked for a company, as a 1099 contractor. The owner misrepresented the position. I was on the road through the week and at home, on the weekends. I didn’t have the work environment to maintain an office. When I returned home, I would have to catch-up with personal affairs. At the end of 2016, I turned-in5 months of expenses for re-imbursement. Nothing was stipulated contractually, as to time limits. In fact, my trainer joked that we could turn them in weekly or wait to receive a Christmas bonus. I worked in Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. Can I file claim in Indiana…the company is located in Missouri? Another consideration, he would micromanage our daily activities, distracting me from carrying out all of my duties. He owes me $7000.

Asked on February 14, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

You incurred your expenses pursuant, or according, to an agreement or understanding (even if only an oral, or unwritten, one) with your employer that they would reimburse you for the expenses. In not reimbursing you, they breached or violated their contractual obligations; you can therefore sue them based on breach of contract for the money. That is your legal recourse to recover the money. You would sue in a state and county in which they have an office (not just a freelancer; an actual office), since a court only has jurisdiction or power over defendants located within its county or having operations in its county. (That is somewhat oversimplified, but is essentially correct.)


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption