Am I legally bound to respond to my neighbors lawyers questions

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Am I legally bound to respond to my neighbors lawyers questions

My daughters neighbor claims her dog bit her son on her property. There is no proof what so ever that her dog could have bit the child. Her lawyer wants her homeowner insurance info. Is she legally bound to respond to her neighbors lawyers requests without them having any kind of proof? Our suspicion is that one of their dogs may have previously bitten the child and they’re trying to put blame on her dog. Many people can attest to the gentle good nature that her dog has. I’ll be glad to provide more details if needed. I’m desperate to know if my daughter has to respond to this lawyer.

Asked on March 19, 2017 under Personal Injury, Colorado

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If your daughter is sued, then she'd have to respond to written questions ("interrogatories"), a written request to provide documents, or to a request for a deposition (that she be questioned on the record); or if somoene else is sued and in that lawsuit against another person, they serve a subpoena on your daughter, she'd need to respond to it with any relevant information they request. But that's because when a lawsuit is going on, there are legal procedures for getting information, which cannot be ignored or refused (unless there are good grounds to object, but the grounds to object tend to be very limited). However, if there is no lawsuit, then you daughter is free to ignore the questions or request, since outside of a lawsuit and the use of legal process, there is no power to compel responses.


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