Am I financially responsible for a problem on a rental property that was there before I moved in?

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Am I financially responsible for a problem on a rental property that was there before I moved in?

I live in a trailerpark so I rent the property but I own my home. On the property there is a family of bees that have made a hive under the shed. The shed and the bees were there prior to me moving in. I was told by neigbors that the bees come every year. Now the park owners want me to pay to get them removed. The park owners have called out an exterminator of there choice and are trying to make me pay for it. I already put cement around the area so the bees can not go in and out and the bees are dieing. The owners still want me to pay for there exterminator. Am I responsible for that bill?

Asked on June 30, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Arizona

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You are not responsible for the payment of the exterminator. If the bees were there prior to your move in, you need to show and prove this is the case. Notarized affidavits by other tenants and any specific reference to it in the lease agreement would be most helpful to you. Emails to the park owners indicating these bees were there prior to your move in does not make you responsible for such cost to remove said bees and that you have accommodated by paying to place cement blocks to mitigate harm. Further, if the landlord continues to try to collect from you, talk to your state office of consumer affairs or attorney general or HUD office about any landlord tenant mediation programs or complaint filing regarding this matter.


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