Where canI find active duty military divorce forms?

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Where canI find active duty military divorce forms?

My husband and I are getting a divorce. He is active duty in the military but not deployed. There are free divorce forms readily available through any law branch in a library, however I cannot use them for a military divorce. How can I get the correct forms, without having to pay a $2,000retainer for a lawyer? I have tried to contact pro bono attorney’s, but they were not able to help with the military law. We are both in agreement, and already have custody of our 2 children worked out. We just need to know how to find the correct forms.

Asked on April 5, 2011 under Family Law, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Try contacting a military lawyer--for example, perhaps someone in your husband's service's Judge Advocate General's office can help you. However, first be aware that there may *not* be a separate form or forms for a divorce by military personnel; matrimonial law is state law; it is not military law, the way that, for example, the uniform military code of conduct is. Even if you were married on a military base, by a military chaplain or other officiant, it should be the case that the divorce process is the same for you as for any other resident of your state. The reason attorneys may not be able to help you is that you may be looking for something that does not exist. All that said, a military attorney--of possibly a military chaplain, who may know about any military wrinkles impacting marriage and divorce--would be a good resource to contact.


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