What is the legal definition of “reasonable time” with regards to an infraction of a condo by law?

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What is the legal definition of “reasonable time” with regards to an infraction of a condo by law?

My girlfriend owns her condo and rented a room out in her house while still occupying the premises. The HOA found out and said she broke the by-laws because she did not submit her tenant for board approval. The board said that she needed to terminate the lease immediately. My girlfriend then is allowing her tenant now to be her guest until she locates a new place. My girlfriend then sent a letter to the HOA’s board to determine how long the now guest could stay. She did not hear from them for 7 days until she received a certified letter stating the guest needed to be out in 2 days. Thoughts?

Asked on March 23, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Arkansas

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

So is she violating the by laws by having a guest?  What does it say in the bylaws?  If I read the question correctly she "terminated" the lease agreement. I think that the HOA thinks that she is lying about that and she should never have sent a letter requesting that she been given a time frame.  She now needs to send a letter indicating that she has terminated the lease agreement as originally requested and in full compliance with the by-laws.  That the status of so and so is now that of a social guest and that as far as she can tell from the by-laws she is not violating anything by having a guest.  That her guest is not permanent and is staying temporarily.  Then she needs to read her by-laws ASAP.  Good luck.


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