About days required to work

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About days required to work

If I worked 6 days already as a full time
employee and refused to go to church as a
christian believer, can my boss fire me as he
have threatened to do so. I worked 7 days last
week as well. Is that legal to be fired under
these circumstances? He said that he will have
to find someone else of I cant handle the work
load even though I’ve been there for about a
year now.

Please let me know what I can do. I want to go
to church so.

Asked on August 31, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, New York

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

Normally, refusing to work 7 days in a row (even week after week) would be grounds to terminate an employee: employers determine the schedule.
IF you ask for a religious accommodation to go to church and/or because your faith bars working on your faith's sabbath, they most likely have to grant it and let you not work that 7th day, assuming that the job can be done without you working that day, which is most likely the case: few, if any, jobs require employees to work all 7 days as a critical factor. If you request a legitimate religous accommodation (i.e. you really need it for your religion; it is not a pretense) and are not granted it or are fired for it, contact the state civil/equal rights agency or the federal EEOC about filing a complaint.


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