What to do about a neighboring tenant’s harassment of me?

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What to do about a neighboring tenant’s harassment of me?

A week ago I got a kitten that is 4 1/2 months old and weighs 4 pounds. All she is doing is playing. The tenant below seems violent since he is always arguing with his wife and sounds like he is hitting things. He has complained to me and what sounds like punching the ceiling even prior to the cat (if my TV was too loud, etc). This man scares me and I just want to enjoy my new kitten. Is there anything I can do? My landlord who gave me permission to get the cat but is now asking me to not let the cat run around and play, which is impossible. I am a female who lives alone and having a man punching the ceiling is scary.

Asked on January 5, 2012 under Real Estate Law, New York

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You have a right under the law to what is known as "quiet enjoyment" of the apartment that you are renting  Your neightbor does a well.  But you aso have a right to feel safe and it sunds as if you do not.  Your landlord has to take this complaint seriously and he has to act on it.  You are being harassed by the guy and maybe you need to file a formal complaint against him.   Keep documenting the complaints to your landlord and if nothing changes, seek legal help.

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you are having problems with the tenant's violent outbursts, you need to have a face to face meeting with your landlord about the situation to see how he or she can intervene to remedy it followed up by a written letter by you confirming the conversation. Keep a copy of the letter for future use and need.

If the problems persist, you need to advise your landlord that either the disruptive tenant needs to leave or it will be you. When your lease is up, then you can make your decision as to either staying or leaving the place that you are occupying.


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