What are my rights if a third party is preventing me from working?

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What are my rights if a third party is preventing me from working?

I have an open DCF case that has been on going for more than 4 years. Regardless of that situation, due to the mandated court hearings, case status reviews, case conferences, etc. it is preventing me from being employed. The court does not allow 24 hours notice to notify me that there is court the next day, so I can’t notify my employer. My job doesn’t provide me with paid time off, so if I need an hour off from work it is a full day of work. The department of

labor/unemployment says because of my court situation preventing me from working, I’m not available for full-time work and therefore am not entitled

to more than $15,000 from mandated time away from my job. If I miss court to go to work I am threatened with having my child removed. This is very traumatic for me.

Asked on July 23, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Connecticut

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You don't have any rights in this regard. The law does NOT provide you compensation, or give you an exemption from any rules or obligations, for time spent on court matters, and neither the other side nor the court owes you anything for the disruption you experience due to court dates. The legql system could not function if people were owed compensation for having to attend court or for having their plans disrupted--the legal system would be bankrupted--and so the law simply does not provide any compensation or other rights when court cases interferewith life.


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