If acop charged me with child endangerment because he thought I wasgoing to drive my car while drunk butI wasn’t, what can I do?

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If acop charged me with child endangerment because he thought I wasgoing to drive my car while drunk butI wasn’t, what can I do?

I had dropped my kid off at her sports practice, ran into a friend and we went to a bar to get a drink. I had a few, I admit. I called my wife from the bar and asked her to pick me up so we could then go get our child. She said she wouldn’t be able to make it in time so I had to go get her. We were walking out to the parking lot to wait for my wife when a cop pulled up and started questioning me. I didn’t say anything to the cop at all, as is my custom. He was practically spitting at me when he asked if I thought I should be driving. Should I speak with a DUI attorney. In Montgomery County, OH.

Asked on September 30, 2010 under Criminal Law, Ohio

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Yes, I think that you should speak with an attorney in your area because I still do not understand how it got from the parking lot of the bar - where your daughter was supposedly not - to a charge of child endangerment.  And you have admitted here that you were about to drive the car somewhere (".... I had to go get her."  who is the "her?").  You seem to have had the wherewithall to know that you could not drive.  And the wherewithall to call your wife.  And it is good that you said nothing in light of the attitude and treatment from the cop.  An attorney will be able to take the facts and place them in the best light.  But learn from this situation.  Good luck.


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