Is it legal for aboss to make verbal physical threats?

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Is it legal for aboss to make verbal physical threats?

A new boss has recently started at our company. From the first moment she arrived she spoke all the time of how she is trained in kick boxing. Now, anytime someone below her makes her mad, she will often threaten them with kick boxing. It’s usually couched something like: “You’ve made me mad and I could take you down because I kick box”. Is this type of threat legal? Our state is a right to work state and the company is not very forgiving of complainers so we would prefer to know our rights before making a formal complaint about her.

Asked on September 30, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Tennessee

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

In every state in this country it is illegal to have threats, harassment, intimidation and discriminination in the work place. If there has been threats by your new boss at the company that you work at, you need to immediately document the threats with the human resources department at your company and if there is not one, contact the supervisor of this person making threats to you to document the threats.

Likewise, you should contact your local labor department over this situation as well and document the situation. Potentially you might desire to consult with legal counsel over the threats and the possibility of retaliation against you when you report it.


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