What to do if amagazine company scammed my husband into buying a high priced subscription and now they are threatening to send him to a collections agency?

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What to do if amagazine company scammed my husband into buying a high priced subscription and now they are threatening to send him to a collections agency?

My husband recently got involved with a scam magazine subscription service. They claim they have him recorded agreeing to a verbal contract with the company and he gave them his debit card number. He attempted to cancel the subscription the next day but they would not let him. They are also only sending half of the subscriptions that he originally ordered. Now we have closed his bank account so they don’t have access to his money and written them a letter to cancel the subscriptions. They are however still threatening to send the case to a collections agency.

Asked on October 28, 2011 under General Practice, Colorado

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

1) You are only obligated, in the first place, to the degree you actually agreed to the subscriptions (formed a contract). If you feel that they are lying and cannot prove that your husband agreed to the subscription, you could refuse to pay, as you have been. That then puts the onus on them to sue if they think they can, then to prove what your husband agreed to.

2) There is no right to cancel a subscription after having agreed to it, unless the company voluntarily allows that to be done; so having tried to cancel the day after would not necessarily help you, if your husband did agree to the subscription.

3) You say your husband was


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